D.C. Anderson Keeps the Love Coming. On Creating Joseph Grimaldi

Actor D.C. Anderson in

Actor D.C. Anderson is “Grimaldi”

D.C. Anderson, an actor known for his freewheeling comic sensibility, has performed across the country including Steppenwolf Theater’s The Ballad of Little Jo and Broadway’s Phantom of the Opera.   

Here’s what he has to say about creating the role of “Grimaldi” in Allan Knee’s “The Astonishing Times” of Timothy Cratchit:

Q. What first attracted you to this play and how did you become involved with it?

A. A fantastic writer of music and lyrics by the name of Andre Catrini asked me to do a reading of the show – I loved it – he has included me in this production – feels good!

Q. I understand there was an actual Joseph Grimaldi who is referenced in this piece.  Can you tell us about him?

A. He was, indeed, thought of as one of the greatest performers of his time in English Pantomime. He was disappointed to only have had a few opportunities to work in productions of plays by William Shakespeare – but his work life was very fulfilling for him. He worked until his body gave out.

Q. What do you feel is a defining character trait of Grimaldi, and how close (or not) is he to you?  How is the character developing through the rehearsal process?

A. He was narcissistic. He believed all his (good) press. I am hoping that  I am finding the humanity in the obsessed performer.

Q. We all know the lessons learned from A Christmas Carol.  What do you think audiences might take away from learning more about Timothy? 

A. ‘Fathers and sons. … A difficult proposition.’

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